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Way to GO for walking harness

Way to GO for walking harness

With so many harnesses available on the market, how do we know if we are choosing the right harness for our best friend? Here are the top 3 things to consider when selecting the right harness!

Sunday 17th November 2019

Why do we recommend using a harness over a collar for walking? We recommend using a harness over a collar for walks, as there may be a risk of excessive pulling to cause repeated strain to the pet’s neck. Whilst a harness allows pressure to be distributed over a larger part of the body and reduces the chance of injury.

With so many harnesses available on the market, how do we know if we are choosing the right harness for our best friend? Here are the top 3 things to consider when selecting the right harness!

1. Free movement in the front legs:

Make sure that there are no straps which cross the shoulders, the chest and the front limbs of your dog. These straps restrict the shoulder range of movement and will affect your dog’s natural walking.

2. Easy breathing- Pressure free at the neck (and wind pipe):

Straps and supporting materials should overlay your dog’s sternum (breastbone) and chest so that pressure is away from the neck and delicate breathing structures like the trachea (wind pipe). Pressure here may cause your dog to cough or breathe noisily.

3. Comfortable materials:

Materials of the harness should not cause any pain, discomfort or friction to the skin. With a harness that has minimal material, it allows heat to be dispersed during walks so that your dog will not get too warm.


Last of all, choose a cool colour that matches your dog’s personality, so they will look glamorous on their daily walk!

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